France’s version of Donald Trump is really, really hot.

Donald Trump may be leading in the polls among Republicans, but don’t be fooled — the majority of Americans absolutely detest him.

And there’s no word strong enough to convey the level of hatred his detractors have for him. They’re disgusted by the mere thought of him. They’re apologetic of the fact that he even comes from this country.

Politics aside, everything about the man is repugnant. His attitude, his demeanor, his diction, and most of all: his appearance.

What makes Donald Trump so easy to hate is the fact that he looks like the human being equivalent of diarrhea.

Le Pen2.jpgIt makes you wonder: if you had a beautiful woman spewing the same type of ignorance as him, would it be met with as much repulsion?

Well, let’s turn to France to find out!

The nation just held the second round of its regional elections, and one of the parties involved, the National Front, a far right, socially conservative political faction, is pushing to close France’s borders and promoting an anti-Muslim sentiment.

Sound familiar?

Though the party’s candidates won zero seats, they did receive a decent chunk of the overall popular vote — 18.74 percent, to be exact. Which shows that, in the wake of last month’s Paris attacks, their fear-mongering tactics did resonate with a lot of people.

While the party leader is a woman named Marine Le Pen, the true heir apparent is widely believed to be her niece, Marion Marechal-Le Pen, whose conservative ideals are much more extreme than her aunt’s.

Just 26 and the youngest member of Parliament in France’s modern political history (she was elected at 22 while still in law school), Marechal-Le Pen is not only anti-immigrant and anti-Islam, but anti-gay marriage.

Sounds abhorrent, right?

Well, I agree. Until I saw what she looked like. And as ashamed as I am to say it, I think she could pretty much say anything and it still wouldn’t bother me.

She could stand at a podium tomorrow and order all bloggers to be Le Pen4.jpgrounded up and waterboarded before being sent to eternal confinement in a deserted detention camp, and I’d just stare at her starry-eyed and nod.

I’d like to think I feel that way only because her positions on controversial issues have absolutely no bearing on me, as a citizen of a completely different country.

But it begs the question — just how much idiocy can a beautiful person get away with? The closest we’ve come to finding this out in America is Sarah Palin and Ann Coulter, and neither had the physical appearance to pass the test. Both are only moderately desirable at best, and only if you squint really, really hard.

For instance, what if Donald Trump’s views were instead coming from his daughter, Ivanka? Would we still feel the same way?

I won’t say I’ll ever root for Marechal-Le Pen to rise to greater power in France, but I will give France a lot of credit.

Their villains, while politically damaging, at least double as the classic femme fatale seductresses you’d see in a 1950s film noir.

Merci, my friends. Merci.

A deeply troubling anti-Islamic sentiment is upon us

I really, really wanted to lighten things up around here today and back away from politics in the aftermath of the Paris attacks.

But there’s one more piece of unfinished business.

I’ve spoken about how the most powerful way to combat terrorism is to show that it hasn’t taken away your spirit or your heart. And I know that sounds like an overly simplistic, idealized, Care-Bearish way to think about it, but I firmly believe it’s true.

New York Times Columnist Paul Krugman today said the most tangible accomplishment terrorist groups like ISIS can achieve is to inspire fear. They can’t establish the type of Islamic state that they so badly want to. Not in Paris, certainly not in the U.S., not anywhere.

They win when their actions cause us to panic. They win when they make us rush to react. And they especially win when they divide us.

Refugees ParisAnd I’m afraid that seems to be what’s happening right now. At least in the immediate aftermath of Friday’s attacks.

Barack Obama has stood firm in his stance to not put American troops on the ground to fight ISIS. His administration has, however, coordinated with the French military in its airstrikes of ISIS strongholds in Syria over the last two days..

At least one presidential candidate, Governor Lindsay Graham of South Carolina — whose polling so low he wasn’t even invited to FOX’s undercard debate last week — wants to send troops, warning that the next “9/11” is on its way from Syria.

But what’s most alarming is the xenophobic, anti-Islamic sentiment that has erupted across the U.S. At least 23 governors — all but one of them Republican — are taking action to prevent Syrian refugees from entering their states.

Another presidential candidate, Bobby Jindal — whose so irrelevant I don’t even remember if he debated or not last week — issued executive action to blockade Syrians from Louisiana.

Donald Trump said he wants to inspect mosques for signs of terrorism. Ben Carson wants Congress to defund federal programs that resettle Syrian refugees in America. Jeb Bush said we should favor Christian refugees over Muslims.

It appears that people are forgetting that the United States’ history of acceptance of all people is what made it the global superpower and world leader it is today. We set the standard for diversity.

Quite simply, the America we know does not exist without the infusion of immigrants.

Does that mean we all get along? No. But the sudden discrimination of Muslims is as anti-American as can be. And it’s all because of the perverted view of a small minority of religious extremists.

It’s OK to be angry. It’s OK to be upset. And it’s certainly understandable to crave justice.

But remember who the enemy is. When we start discriminately searching for people to blame, that’s when we lose all the values that make us who we are.

Do you know what takes real courage in the face of hardship? Not giving into intimidation or fear tactics, especially those spewed by political stakeholders who have their own ulterior motives.

It’s up to you to make up your own mind.

Pray for Paris. But pray for Baghdad and Beirut, too.

The world remains grief-stricken over the bloody events in Paris on Friday night, details of which have begun to surface over the last 48 hours. The death toll has risen to 132, and many more remain seriously injured.

Residents of the French city have crowded around memorials dedicated to the victims, still in a state of shock and apprehension, as evidenced by multiple false alarms on Sunday that caused mourners to run in terror of a repeat attack.

The nation wasted no time responding. French warplanes have bombed Raqqa, the self-proclaimed capital of ISIS in Syria, making it clear that the world is on the brink of war, in some capacity.

Sympathizers worldwide have taken to Facebook to show their solidarity, which has allowed users to overlay their profile pictures in the colors of the French flag.

Beirut attack

Mourners in Beirut, Lebanon

Some disturbing rhetoric has manifested from people who crave justice. Many, like Republican presidential candidates, are blaming so-called lax policies during the migration crisis for the attacks, failing to comprehend that the people who are escaping Syria are fleeing from the very same thing that Parisian bystanders ran away from on Friday night. Others are unabashedly pointing to strict gun control laws in Paris as a contributor to the tragedy.

When unprecedented, tragic events like this unfold, it becomes easy to trick yourself into thinking that nothing else in the world is happening. That everything else stands still and that we should all focus our attention towards this one thing and one thing only.

But that would be a mistake. Because in the process, you’d be ignoring tragedies that happened in other parts of the world this weekend.

On Thursday, a suicide bomb at a funeral in Baghdad killed at least 17 and wounded 33. On Friday, the same day as the Paris attacks, suicide bombers in Beirut killed 43 and wounded 239. Both attacks, which ISIS has taken credit for, were targeting Shiites, which the Sunni terrorist organization sees as heretics.

The death tolls of both pale in comparison to that of Paris’s, but if the overlying message people have been declaring this weekend is that an attack on innocent civilians anywhere is an attack on all of humanity, than why should that matter?

Honoring Beirut hero, Adel Termos

Honoring Beirut hero, Adel Termos

The mass media is partly to blame, which has been focusing nearly all of its coverage towards Paris, and therefore impeding news of the Baghdad and Beirut bombings from reaching the general public.

An Indian blogger, Karuna Ezara Parikh, took to Twitter to voice her frustration over this disparity in attention by writing a beautiful poem that has been shared by thousands.

Ignoring these two deadly incidents also means ignoring one Lebanese victim of the Beirut attack, Adel Termos, who, while out with his daughter, tackled a suicide-bomber before he could enter a mosque, potentially saving hundreds of lives. The bomber detonated his vest in the struggle, killing himself and Termos. He’s a hero. There are mixed reports as to whether his daughter survived.

Everybody should know his name. Adel Termos.

Where’s the option on Facebook to drape your profile picture in Lebanese colors, some have lamented. Others point to the skin color of the victims resulting in the unbalanced coverage.

I think it’s inappropriate to compare the scale of these attacks to one another, or use them to fuel your own political bias. However, besides the higher number of casualties in Paris, it’s easy to understand why it’s getting more attention. It’s an iconic city that many people have visited and fallen in love with. A place of beauty and rich history. It’s among the most glamorous cities in the world.

The same cannot be said, unfortunately, about Baghdad and Beirut, two cities mired in the ever-worsening turmoil ongoing in the Middle East.

Pray for Paris, indeed, but pray for Baghdad and Beirut, too.

All three were attacks on humanity, in different parts of the world.

All three should bring us together as one.