Jimmy Kimmel is the most human late show host on TV

Anybody who watches Jimmy Kimmel’s late night show knows that the man cries a lot.

He teared up when discussing the death of Cecil the Lion two years ago; he couldn’t hold it back when he mourned the passing of legendary comic Don Rickles late last month; and most recently, and certainly understandably, he openly wept when revealing on his show that his son was born with a heart defect that required life-saving emergency surgery.

Seeing somebody express raw emotion and vulnerability always gives you greater insight into who they are as a human being.

What makes us so unique to any other species is our ability to emote and to experience real sorrow. It’s what makes life tragic and glorious at the same time.

So to see Jimmy Kimmel have a moment of pure emotion like that only adds to his appeal. Especially since his story is so undeniably sympathetic. Any child being born with a heart defect is saddening.

Jimmy Kimmel family.png

But what’s made Kimmel’s monologue so particularly memorable was his inclusion of politics. While he didn’t directly malign any one or group in particular, he bemoaned the fact that those with preexisting medical conditions who were afforded protection against healthcare discrimination under Obamacare may lose those protections under a new Republican plan.

And he pointed to his newborn son as a living and breathing example of this. “If your baby is going to die … it shouldn’t matter how much money you make. I think that’s something, whether you’re a Republican or Democrat, we all agree on,’ he said to raucous applause.

Kimmel has received mostly support from his TV colleagues and the general public. But of course, there are those few — like this former Republican Senator — who just can’t bring it upon themselves to look past politics and see the human element.

Obamacare may be repealed as soon as Thursday. And Kimmel is right about something: we need to stop kicking this issue around like it’s a political football. These are people’s lives at stake. It’s not a game. It’s not about politics.

But what makes the topic of healthcare so dicey is one simple fact: we are selfish.

And there’s nothing wrong with being selfish. To make it in this world, you need to look out for yourself and your best interests.

The reason people don’t like Obamacare is because premiums and their deductibles are high. They’re healthy and yet they’re paying an exorbitant amount for insurance because they’re being forced to by Obamacare’s mandate.

But the subtext to that statement is you don’t want to contribute your share to cut the costs for sick people.

I understand that money is hard to come by. Very few of us make enough to support the life that we wish to live.

But that is the reality of why healthcare is such a polarizing issue in our country at this moment.

At some point, you have to ask yourself: Are you willing to make a few sacrifices to prop up your fellow Americans, and fellow humans.?

Jimmy Kimmel’s little boy was saved.

Will the next one be?

Advertisements

How I missed the biggest mix-up in Oscars history

It was supposed to work our perfectly. I booked my work-related flight from New York to Phoenix on Academy Awards Sunday through Jet Blue, where I could watch the ceremony live on the plane.

Indeed, it would make the Oscars that much more memorable. When I look back on the 89th Academy Awards in the future, I’d always remember that I watched it live in the air. It would make my nearly six-hour flight go by that much quicker, and pending technical difficulties, I wouldn’t miss a second of the action.

So it was with deep befuddlement when I first sat down in the plane one hour before show time, when I realized that my in-flight television got basically every channel but ABC, which was broadcasting the ceremony.

But I didn’t become alarmed just yet. After all, it made no sense. Why would ABC not be there? Not only was every other basic cable channel available, but there was also some secondary channels like NBC Sports, MTV, TNT. So why not ABC? I figured maybe it was listed under another channel name or something.

moon-la-la-light

That’s when the flight attendant informed me that ABC is one of the few channels that has not given permission for JetBlue to use.

Still, I didn’t start panicking. I had my laptop and JetBlue had Wi-Fi.

Then I discovered that the live feed on ABC.com was not accessible from my flight.

No worries, though, the Oscars website has a live stream … which redirected to ABC.com.

In a last-ditch effort, I searched Google and Twitter for live streams, which probably weren’t licensed by ABC or the Oscars, but hey, you gotta do what you gotta do. Finally, with about 15 minutes to spare, I found a live YouTube stream. It was a bit grainy, but it was live and perfectly watchable. I breathed a huge sigh of relief.

Come 8:30 p.m., we were comfortably sitting at cruising altitude, Justin Timberlake was opening the show with his summer hit “Can’t Stop the Feeling,” and I had a cocktail in hand. I was perfectly set for the next four hours.

Then my live stream cut out due to copyright infringement.

A few unsuccessful searches later, I resigned my fate. I would miss the Oscars. Fortunately, though, it’s 2017, and I was able to get up-to-the-second updates on the awards, and then able to find a clip on YouTube minutes later to see the actual footage. I was basically watching the Oscars on a delay, with no suspense whatsoever.

But for most of the broadcast, the show was very enjoyable. Jimmy Kimmel filled the spacesCasey Affleck nicely with some great gags involving tourists and Matt Damon, and while politics did not dominate the event, there was still some powerful moments, highlighted by the Best Foreign Film-winning director Asghar Farhadi’s decision to boycott the show in protest of Trump’s previously-struck-down travel ban.

Furthermore, I was on a roll. With the exception of Best Leading Actor going to Casey Affleck — much to the dismay of many females — I had predicted almost every major category correctly.

All that was left was for me to correctly predict Moonlight for Best Picture.

The following text message conversation ensued shortly after midnight between a friend and I:

Me: Tell me when they’re announcing Best Picture.

Friend: Right now.

Me: Moonlight plz

Friend: La La Land

Me: *sad cat emoji*

Friend: It won seven awards in total.

one minute passes…

Friend: Wait

Friend: Moonlight won

Friend: There was a mistake. Wtf

Me: Are you being serious lol

Friend: Yes. You need to watch that clip.

Me: Did they pull a Steve Harvey?

Friend: They were halfway through the speeches.

Me: I AM MISSING EVERYTHING.

emma-stoneOf all the Oscars to miss live, it had to be this one.

For the viewer, it was obviously a very entertaining sequence of events. And while I am glad that justice was wrought and Moonlight ultimately won, I couldn’t help but be saddened that the people involved with the film didn’t get to have the full experience of winning the industry’s biggest award. It really would have been a memorable moment.

Instead, we got a circus.

We now know what happened amid the chaos, thanks largely to Jimmy Kimmel’s late night monologue the next day. It wasn’t Warren Beatty’s fault. Wasn’t really Faye Dunaway’s fault. Wasn’t Matt Damon’s fault.

It was the accounting firm that tallies the votes.

When in doubt, blame the accountants.

All in all, as bad as that snafu was, you’ve got to hand it to the La La Land crew for how graciously they handled the situation. And as a result, I think Moonlight and La La Land should now be made into one movie.

In fact, I’m working on the script now.

Ladies and gentlemen, I present to you, Moon La La Light.

It probably won’t be the next Hamilton.