It’s so much easier to be mad at Kendall Jenner than Donald Trump

Being angry at Donald Trump is like being mad at a tornado.

It’s an indestructible force, unleashing mayhem on whatever sits in its path. Any territory it passes through is left in significantly worse condition than when it first got there.

But there’s nothing you can do anymore to stop it. It’s too powerful.

Coincidentally, tornadoes are ravaging the Southeast as we speak. I blame Trump.

But my point isn’t that we shouldn’t react to Trump anymore, but rather, it’s just frustrating how powerless we are against his wrath.

As much as we harness all our hatred towards him, as much as our friends all join together to mock him, and as disastrously low his approval ratings sink, he is still president. It’s maddening.

So it’s a lot easier to conserve at least a portion of your hatred towards a much easier target – like, for instance, Kendall Jenner!

For the most part, Kendall Jenner has been the least antagonized among the Kardashian clan. She doesn’t really do much to garner attention, but just by virtue of her familial ties, she began her public life in an uphill battle to earn approval. And if you’re a Kardashian or a Jenner, it’s one strike and you’re out.

Kendall Jenner

Well, Kendall didn’t even strike out. She got walloped in the head by a 99-mile-per-hour fastball.

As many of you heard, the Internet was livid yesterday over a new Pepsi ad starring Jenner that exploited public protesting to advertise its product.

It’s nothing new for companies to capitalize on social issues for their own personal gain. But this one clearly struck a chord with the general public, especially in light of today’s divisive politic atmosphere and racial tension.

Protests have become ubiquitous since Donald Trump took office. They’re so commonplace that when we hear about a new one, it kind of goes in one ear and out the other.

But we forget that before Trump, protests stemmed out of desperation from those who found no other ways to have their voices heard, from the disenfranchised to the discriminated.

These public displays were much more consequential, and significantly more violent. People have died in protests. They’ve been beaten. They’ve been arrested.

It feels like a long time ago, but places like Baltimore and Ferguson are still emotionally scarred from the conflicts that took place in their cities between civilians and police, particularly young black Americans who feel like they’ve never been given a fair chance in life.

So for Pepsi to trivialize the issue by suggesting that all can be solved with a sugary carbonated beverage was bound to piss a lot of people off.

And of course, Kendall Jenner, who probably signed a million-dollar contract to be in the commercial before she even knew what it involved, somehow got caught up in the mess.

As always, when something controversial happens, the Internet responds tremendously. This was no exception.

And on Wednesday, their voices were heard. Pepsi has pulled the commercial, explaining that they failed in their goal of “trying to project a global message of unity, peace and understanding.”

So, we successful protested the protest commercial.

Yay?

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