Oops, United Airlines did it again

Since the election, we’ve learned that if anyone besides Donald Trump or a member of his administration becomes the focus of national outrage, it means they screwed up really badly.

I’m talking an epic screw-up.

It was just two weeks ago when United Airlines accomplished this dubious honor by denying two young girls entry to a flight because they were wearing leggings.

Not long after, United Airlines was off the hook when Pepsi stole the spotlight with their shockingly tone deaf commercial that trivialized the racial and political unrest that fuels public protests.

But United Airlines apparently missed the notoriety spotlight, and would not be denied.

And they’re back, baby! All it took was the roughing up of a Chinese doctor and dragging his semi-conscious, bloody body off an airplane.

You all have heard about this in some capacity, as it’s made headline news over the last two days.

The video looks terrible. What we see is a law enforcement official savagely pulling the limp human body of a man who paid to be on the flight, and had already been boarded and had been seated – all because the airline overbooked the flight and needed to clear seats for flight attendants who were scheduled to work on a different flight.

If you think this should result a shitstorm of backlash and fury towards United Airlines, then you’d be exactly right.

But there is a lot to digest here.

UA passenger

For one, the incident has brought to the spotlight the practice of airline overbooking. This is unfortunately a fairly common practice, as we forget that airlines don’t just exist for our own traveling purposes, but to actually make money. In anticipation of flight no-shows, airlines will frequently overbook flights to maximize the odds of every seat being filled.

But when overbookings occur, it should seem like common sense for the airline officials to remove passengers before they board, right? If I’m sitting at an airline gate for two hours, and then proceed to board the plane and stow away my luggage, then you’re damned right that I’m going to be pissed off too if I’m suddenly asked to get off.

After the man initially refused to leave, witnesses say that he somehow ran back onto the plane after he was forcibly removed the first time. Then the chaos that we all saw on video ensued. And it’s not a pretty sight.

The resulting public fury was inevitable.

The American public greatly empathized with this situation because we’ve all had our own airport misadventures. We’ve all experienced a time when we wanted to wish nothing but fire and brimstone on a specific airline.

However, when your flight is delayed, we are mostly powerless. Sure, you can curse out an airline on Twitter, and while that feels very invigorating in the moment, it ultimately accomplishes nothing.

But this was our moment. Now, we all get to take out our combined rage on an airline, over an incident that was created by their own mistakes, overlaid by an overbooking practice that we all despise.

Not even another Pepsi screw-up is going to get United Airlines out of this one.

And it’s not just America that’s pissed. This has apparently ignited an international incident, reaching front page news in China, and fueling the belief of many in that country that the western hemisphere behaves in a discriminatory manner towards Chinese people.

But after the public fury failed to dissipate, United Airlines finally took full responsibility for the episode, with CEO Oscar Munoz publicly apologizing and ordering a complete investigation of the procedural mistakes that led to this incident. The officer seen dragging the passenger was also suspended.

The damage, however, is done. There are calls to boycott the airlines. An online petition titled #ChineseLivesMatter calls for a federal investigation into the matter, the Internet memes are out in full force.

So, United Airlines, you’re not getting off the hook this time. I don’t care what the Trump administration says or does, this time you —

Wait, what’s that? White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer evoked an ill-advised and insensitive comparison to Adolf Hitler when discussing Syria?

United Airlines, you can pretty much get away with anything for the next four years.

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It’s so much easier to be mad at Kendall Jenner than Donald Trump

Being angry at Donald Trump is like being mad at a tornado.

It’s an indestructible force, unleashing mayhem on whatever sits in its path. Any territory it passes through is left in significantly worse condition than when it first got there.

But there’s nothing you can do anymore to stop it. It’s too powerful.

Coincidentally, tornadoes are ravaging the Southeast as we speak. I blame Trump.

But my point isn’t that we shouldn’t react to Trump anymore, but rather, it’s just frustrating how powerless we are against his wrath.

As much as we harness all our hatred towards him, as much as our friends all join together to mock him, and as disastrously low his approval ratings sink, he is still president. It’s maddening.

So it’s a lot easier to conserve at least a portion of your hatred towards a much easier target – like, for instance, Kendall Jenner!

For the most part, Kendall Jenner has been the least antagonized among the Kardashian clan. She doesn’t really do much to garner attention, but just by virtue of her familial ties, she began her public life in an uphill battle to earn approval. And if you’re a Kardashian or a Jenner, it’s one strike and you’re out.

Kendall Jenner

Well, Kendall didn’t even strike out. She got walloped in the head by a 99-mile-per-hour fastball.

As many of you heard, the Internet was livid yesterday over a new Pepsi ad starring Jenner that exploited public protesting to advertise its product.

It’s nothing new for companies to capitalize on social issues for their own personal gain. But this one clearly struck a chord with the general public, especially in light of today’s divisive politic atmosphere and racial tension.

Protests have become ubiquitous since Donald Trump took office. They’re so commonplace that when we hear about a new one, it kind of goes in one ear and out the other.

But we forget that before Trump, protests stemmed out of desperation from those who found no other ways to have their voices heard, from the disenfranchised to the discriminated.

These public displays were much more consequential, and significantly more violent. People have died in protests. They’ve been beaten. They’ve been arrested.

It feels like a long time ago, but places like Baltimore and Ferguson are still emotionally scarred from the conflicts that took place in their cities between civilians and police, particularly young black Americans who feel like they’ve never been given a fair chance in life.

So for Pepsi to trivialize the issue by suggesting that all can be solved with a sugary carbonated beverage was bound to piss a lot of people off.

And of course, Kendall Jenner, who probably signed a million-dollar contract to be in the commercial before she even knew what it involved, somehow got caught up in the mess.

As always, when something controversial happens, the Internet responds tremendously. This was no exception.

And on Wednesday, their voices were heard. Pepsi has pulled the commercial, explaining that they failed in their goal of “trying to project a global message of unity, peace and understanding.”

So, we successful protested the protest commercial.

Yay?